National Geographic’s Best Photographs of 2016

Amazing collection of photos from National Geographic.

Blood drips from a Rüppell’s vulture’s beak. The neck and head are sparsely feathered, which helps keep gore, guts, and fecal matter from clinging in a deep carcass dive.
This photo was originally published in “Vultures Are Revolting. Here’s Why We Need to Save Them.” in January 2016.

Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in China’s Wolong Nature Reserve.
This photo was originally published in “Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side,” in August 2016

On their first migration to their summer range in southeastern Yellowstone, three-week-old calves of the Cody elk herd follow their mothers up a 4,600-foot slope.
This photo was originally published in “The Yellowstone We Don’t See: A Struggle of Life and Death,” in May 2016.

As the train nears the end of the journey at Kashgar station, a child draws a heart in the desert sand that came along for the ride.
This photo was originally published in “Travel 3,000 Miles Through China’s Wondrous Wild West,” in July 2016.

Lounging in inches of warm water, blacktip reef sharks wait for the tide to refill the lagoon at Seychelles’ Aldabra Atoll.
This photo was originally published in “In the Seychelles, Taking Aim at Nature’s Bullies,” in March 2016.

Isra Ali Saalad moved from Somalia to Sweden with her mother and two siblings. “The reason we came to this country is because it is safe,” says her sister, Samsam.
This photo was originally published in “The New Europeans,” in October 2016.

At Fort Hall, Idaho, Leo Teton stands next to a pole ornamented with bison skulls, representing the spiritual connection between the Shoshone-Bannock tribe and bison.
This photo was originally published in “How Ranching and Hunting Shape Protections for Bison and Elk,” in May 2016.

A panda keeper in China uses a stuffed leopard to train young pandas to fear their biggest wild foe. A cub’s reactions help determine if the bear is ready to survive on its own.
This photo was originally published in “Pandas Get to Know Their Wild Side,” in August 2016.

A girl watches as three Kurdish women are photographed with their faces hidden. Two of the women say they were forced to marry ISIS fighters before escaping to a refugee camp.
This photo was originally published in “Kurds Fight to Preserve ‘the Other Iraq,'” in March 2016.

Indigenous people farm and hunt in Peru’s Manú forest but only for their own subsistence. Spider monkeys are a favorite quarry—and also favorite pets.
This photo was originally published in “This Park in Peru Is Nature ‘in Its Full Glory’—With Hunters,” in June 2016.

Within sight of downtown Seoul, South Korea’s capital and a hub of modern stressful life, salesman Sungvin Hong rests after a hike in Bukhansan National Park.
This photo was originally published in “This Is Your Brain on Nature,” in January 2016.

Gerd Gamanab, 67, sought treatment too late: Years of labor in the Namibian sun and dust destroyed his corneas. His blindness likely could have been prevented.
This photo was originally published in “Why There’s New Hope About Ending Blindness,” in September 2016.

Villagers in Bagaran, Armenia, sing of cultural endurance and survival while picnicking at night beneath apricot trees—and a giant cross that shines defiantly into Turkey.
This photo was originally published in “A Century Later, Slaughter Still Haunts Turkey and Armenia,” in April 2016.

To track changes in sea ice, the Norwegian research vessel Lance drifted along with it for five months in 2015, on a rare voyage from Arctic winter into spring.
This photo was originally published in “Extreme Research Shows How Arctic Ice Is Dwindling,” in January 2016.

Kirk Odom was convicted of rape after an expert testified that a hair on the victim’s nightgown matched his. He spent years in prison before DNA tests proved his innocence.
This photo was originally published in “How Science Is Putting a New Face on Crime Solving,” in July 2016.

The colors of Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone come from thermophiles: microbes that thrive in scalding water.
This photo was originally published in “Learning to Let the Wild Be Wild in Yellowstone,” in May 2016.

The capital of Taiwan, Taipei comes to vibrant life when the sun goes down.
This photo was originally published in “Getaway Game: Taipei in 72 Hours,” in National Geographic Traveler.

A pet saddleback tamarin hangs on to Yoina Mameria Nontsotega as the Matsigenka girl takes a dip in the Yomibato River, deep inside Peru’s Manú National Park.
This photo was originally published in “This Park in Peru Is Nature ‘in Its Full Glory’—With Hunters,” in June 2016

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